Dry Spell

Dry Spell Hits Manipur’s Ukhrul District

DAILY BYTES

The severe phase of a dry spell has brought down a serious threat to Ukhrul‘s agriculture sector, even as parts of Manipur is hit by flood due to the torrential monsoon rains over the past few weeks.

It is quite bizarre to note that at a time when most of the states and districts of Northeast is reeling under severe flood, some parts are also hit by the dry spell of monsoon.

The dry spell has hit the farming and agriculture sector hard and this has led to a decrease in the production of food grains and crops.

The scanty rainfall has forced many farmers to quit farming and they have been on the lookout for some other professional engagements.

While a majority of farmers have abandoned their farmlands in search of better avenues, a very few, on the other hand, have tried sowing previously un-sowed crops and they are uncertain if the final result would be beneficial for them or not.

“Even though some of the rivers in Manipur are overflowing with water, but some rivers are reeling under a dry spell. Moreover, the water carried by the swelling rivers could not be used properly for cropping and farming. This has affected the farmers. Unlike rest of the Northeast, especially Arunachal Pradesh and Assam, the rainfall received by Manipur has been quite less,” Suraj Sarma, a resident of Imphal said The Story Mug in a telephonic conversation.

“If this continues, then I am quite sure the agriculture-oriented economy will feel the heat,” Sarma further adds.

It is worth mentioning here that the state of Manipur has been facing a drought-like situation as there has been a 70 per cent deficit rainfall.

“We have received rain, but the amount of rain received is not adequate. What we have received is a deficit rainfall,” Sarma further says.

Flood in Assam affected over 5 million people and around 1.79 lakh hectare of agricultural land is inundated with water.

As per reports so far 95 wild animals, including 8 rhinos, have died in Assam flood this year.

The positive news, however, is that floodwater is receding and people in batches are returning to their houses, rather say to the remains (ruins) of the houses left behind the deluge.

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