Gehraiyaan film poster

Gehraiyaan Review: Love Can Never Be Absolute

Gehraiyaan exposes the gullibility of human emotions, something that filmmakers these days are a bit sceptical to address. It’s a social commentary, a much-needed one

February 13, 2022

Ever since the trailer of Gehraiyaan dropped on YouTube, people had been tweeting, posting, and even making 15-20 minutes long videos pointing out all the probable flaws that the film would have, some even going on to the extent of calling it "anti-Indian".

A Dharma Production film, of course, would not be without its share of problematic treatment of certain issues (death, for instance). Having said that, Gehraiyaan is undoubtedly an antithesis to previous Dharma ventures (K2H2, K3G, etc.) and stands out in its treatment of a plethora of harsh realities of life. It's not a story about adultery or betrayal; on the contrary, it's about the pragmatisms of the journey called life.

It's a film about the repercussions of the choices we make, and the circumstances that steer those choices. It's about, as summed up in one fine particular line, "....starting again is difficult but it's still a choice." No doubt there are times when you are bereft of options, but what Gehraiyaan establishes towards the end is that it's never too late.

Gehraiyaan tells you that love can never be absolute (one reason why I am against the institution of marriage): just because you are presently in love with a person does not mean that you are bound to spend the entirety of your life with the same person.

Love, like any other emotion, is dynamic, and if it's not, then it's less love and more conformity to the established ideas of love. This film raises several pertinent questions on the general understanding of the issues of "cheating" and "betrayal", forcing you to go into some introspection.

The film is just a refreshing relief from unnecessarily hyped flicks like Pushpa and Sooryavanshi for it’s relatable, especially for people who have engendered self-doubts in their minds, about their decisions and choices.

This is a film that does not indulge indispensable conflicts on morality but delves straight into a rationalist approach to life.

It exposes the gullibility of human emotions, something that filmmakers these days are a bit sceptical to address. It’s a social commentary, a much-needed one, one that makes you confront and challenge the established notions of the “perfect life” and the “perfect life partner”. It is a film on the “perfect flaws” that define the very human existence.

I loved the film! And Deepika, for all reasons, just stands out.

I give it 3.5 out of 5 stars!

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